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What Elastic Logistics Means to Businesses?

By Logistics Tech Outlook | Tuesday, November 05, 2019

Elastic logistics is an agile method where the pull of customer demand sets up lead times for deliveries and replenishment. The idea behind the process is to react swiftly before or just after the requirement or need arises.

FREMONT, CA: In today’s digital era, the relationship between demand and supply has been transformed from what it originally began as. Once a supplier-focused domain, now has become more consumer-centric to the point at which customer-demands now represent the process flow within the supply chain business.

The customer is a free radical. Unpredictable in nature and uncontrollable, corporate elasticity is not only imperative but is guaranteed to be well received. From the right software, hardware, warehouse management, e-commerce, and more, facilitating the shift to flexible everyday jobs automatically is a requirement for streamlining the leading industry powers.

When Elastic Logistics is at the Core

Elastic logistics is an agile method where the pull of customer demand sets up lead times for deliveries and replenishment. The idea behind the process is to react swiftly before or just after the requirement or need arises. Businesses want fast go-to-market distribution with precise tracing and tracking for all moving merchandise and trucks. They want to trim down turnaround times, close down lead times, move more shipments, and serve the end-customer faster.

Elastic logistics means the need for companies to be able to expand and contract effortlessly with the demands of customer or market demand. The process is a new and evolved version of the lean supply chain movement. As technology catches up with logistics, the latest route planning and delivery schedule help companies stay on top of all market demand fluctuations. The processes keep their products on shelves at all times or reach the consumer’s door within a day or two.

All technology enhancements require one’s workforce to adopt and use them well. The instance is where change management comes into the picture—there is always a learning curve involved; some would take it on quickly, while for others, it might not be that simple.

If, with such automation, one is inclined to buy-in to the latest misgivings about technology replacing human jobs, then there is more to it. One will not have to sacrifice the workforce in the name of automation; in fact, it can only work to the advantage to keep them. Altogether, the logistics industry has time and again grown in job availability rates. The business, from manual warehouse work to supply chain management has developed even in times of economic struggle and will continue to do so.

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